Academic News of June 2018

More than 1 million images now publicly available at library.artstor.org

Artstor has made more than 1 million image, video, document, and audio files from public institutional collections freely available to everyone—subscribers and non-subscribers alike–at library.artstor.org. These collections are being shared by institutions who make their content available via JSTOR Forum, a tool that allows them to catalog, manage, and share digital media collections and make them discoverable to the widest possible audience. ( See More )

China and Asia Leading the Way in Information Science and Technology

In today’s technologically advanced world, information science has proven to be an essential, far-reaching field of study, playing a role in numerous disciplines. China in particular has become a technological powerhouse in Asia, leading the way in areas such as cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, mobile communication, cryptocurrency, and e-commerce. As an important leader in information science and technology research, Asia offers a comprehensive amount of research and studies in this field. ( See More )

Three specialist libraries to close at University of Auckland, 45 jobs to go

The University of Auckland will close three specialist libraries, with the loss of around 45 fulltime-equivalent staff.
The decision has been condemned by the Auckland University Student’s Association, which says the move will be bad for students and creative arts at the institution. ( See More )

How we discovered three poisonous books in our university library

Some may remember the deadly book of Aristotle that plays a vital part in the plot of Umberto Eco’s 1980 novel The Name of the Rose. Poisoned by a mad Benedictine monk, the book wreaks havoc in a 14th-century Italian monastery, killing all readers who happen to lick their fingers when turning the toxic pages. Could something like this happen in reality? Poisoning by books? ( See More )

Ancient Buddhist collection reprinted

A Song Dynasty (960-1279) Tripitaka, a precious collection of ancient Buddhist classics, has been reprinted through the joint efforts of Chinese and Japanese scholars.
The reprinted collection contains 5,500 volumes, weighs a metric ton and is priced at 2.66 million yuan ($413,000).
First compiled at the Sixi Yuanjue Monastery in Huzhou during the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127), the collection, titled Sixizang, was completed in the year 1132 but was later ruined during war. ( See More )

Sources : LibraryLearningSpace


hit counter Views

149459total visits,780visits today